Quick Answer: Can We Use But And If Together?

Can but and if be used together?

If …..

,but…..

because they are both conjunction..

Is but since correct?

Yes, you can put two conjunctions together, but only if the first one is a coordinating conjunction (and, or, so, but, for, yet, nor) and the second one a subordinating conjunction (because, after, although, since, etc.). For example, but because and so although are correct, but not because but or although so.

What is difference between due to and because of?

‘due to’ is used to modify nouns only. ‘Because of’ is used to modify verbs. … In simple example sentence 1, the verb before due to is is while in simple example sentence 2, because of is preceded by the verb happened.

Which is correct I will or I would?

Most of the times, the source of the confusion is the perception that “would” is always used as the past form of the auxiliary verb “will”. Yes, “would” is the past form of “will”, but it has various other uses too, which have nothing to do with the fact that would is the past form of “will”.

Will in if clause?

The short answer is no, but there are exceptions to the rule. An if- or when-clause (often used to form conditional sentences) generally does not contain “will,” which is the simple future tense of the verb “to be.” One exception is when the action in the if- or when-clause takes place after that in the main clause.

What can I use instead of since?

sinceafter,après,behind,below,following,next to,past.

Where is since used?

When using since, we normally use present perfect and past perfect tenses in the main clause of the sentence. You wouldn’t use since when you are talking about the future because, by definition, since refers to specific point in the past.

Will it or would it?

Will can be a present tense verb that means to cause something to happen through force of desire. It can also be a modal auxiliary verb in various tenses. Would is a past tense form of will. It is also a conditional verb that indicates an action that would happen under certain conditions.

Does Since mean because?

A: While “because” does imply cause, “since” can imply time or cause. … It means that most of the time these words are synonymous and you can use either one.

Would vs Will future?

Would is a past-tense form of will. If you are writing about past events, you can use it to indicate something that was in the future at that point in time, but is not necessarily in the future right now. In other words, you use would to preserve the future aspect when talking about the past.

Can you use but and so in the same sentence?

It’s fine to use “but” and “so”, and your sentence is grammatically correct. … The first comma can be omitted, but it’s not a real problem. The second comma is also fine, but it could also be a semi-colon or even a separate sentence without “so” .

Can you use since and because in the same sentence?

Strict grammarians may not like it, but “since” and “because” can be synonyms. “Since I love you, let’s get married” means the same thing as “Because I love you, let’s get married.” (Yes, you can use “because” at the beginning of a sentence.)

Can Since replace Because?

According to the 6th edition of the APA Publication Manual (p. 84), the use of since is more precise when it is used to refer only to time (to mean “after”). You should replace it with because when that is what is really meant.

Is since formal?

As and since are more formal than because. We usually put a comma before since after the main clause: … We often use as and since clauses at the beginning of the sentence.